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20120901
20120930
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WHUT (Howard University Television) 28
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English 28
Search Results 0 to 27 of about 28 (some duplicates have been removed)
not accept what happened from some of the citizens of the united states who offended the prophet mohammed-- peace be upon him. there was also somebody who wanted to burn the koran and this is something we do not accept at all. so the demonstrations were an expression of a high level of anger and a rejection of what is happening and the u.s. embassy represents the symbol of america as a people and government so people, the demonstrators, had a loud voice and as a government, it's our responsibility as the government of egypt we protected the embassy. we do not condone any attack against any embassies or any guests. this is a part of our principles and culture and what our religion orders us to do. >> rose: so the united states government and egyptian government are friends, not enemies? >> ( translated ): we are not enemies, of course. >> rose: you're our friends? >> ( translated ): for sure we are friends. >> rose: allies? >> the u.s. president said otherwise. >> rose: i know he did. but i'm asking the egyptian president. do you consider the united states an ally? >> ( translated ): this
president of the united states bill clinton in conversation with me and my colleague at cbs nora o'donnell. >> rose: do you think this election the president has said that change has to come from outside rather than in washington, that this election has the possibility of producing a change that will be able to overcome gridlock. >> i don't think it to the only has the possibility, i think it almost certainly will. and let me explain why. i think the president's going to win but let's assume governor romney won. if he wins, that almost certainly means the republicans will hold on to the house and it will be about 50/50 in the senate, more or less the way it is now. you can't filibuster a budget. it's the only thing that doesn't require 60 votes in the senate to pass o as opposed to 51. so a lot of the policymaking will be pushed into the budget and he'll just have to pick up one or two people on that. if you assume that he is going to do what he said he's going to do, i think a lot of his priorities will be enacted. and i think it will be bad on the budget side, as i said. includin
at the importance of kazakhstan in the region, and it's a relationship which the united states. "this is america" visits of the republic of kazakhstan. "this is america" is made possible by -- the national education association, the nation's largest advocate for children and public education. poongsan corporation, forging a higher global standard. the ctc foundation, afo communications, and the rotondaro family trust. later, i will talk with kazakhstan's foreign minister. right now, a visit with the u.s. ambassador to kazakhstan, kenneth fairfax. >> what should americans know about kazakhstan? >> i think the short answer is a lot more than they currently do. >> thank you. >> it is the ninth largest country on earth. it is a country that has a rather extraordinary relations with the united states, and yet most people really know either nothing or worse than nothing -- what they have seen in a movie, which is the opposite of reality, of course. there is a lot to learn. >> what are the mutual interests of the two countries, the united states and kazakhstan? >> we have many. you can look at it as an
between russia and the united states. iran is another is the dis trust over nato's defense shield. earlier this month the u.s. agency of the international development to lead russia. i'm pleased to have sergey lavrov back at this table, welcome. >> thank you very much, nice to be back. >> rose: u.s.-russia relations. >> yes, i believe we agree that these relations should be promoted. when president obama came to the whitehouse, he and his team assessed the relationship between moscow and washington and suggested what they call the reset of those relations which we supported. and i believe that since then, we have been having understanding between us, between moscow and russia, that the really mutually beneficial partnership in the interest of the russian and american people in the interest of international relations given the importance of the two countries can be based on equal, mutually respectful, mutually beneficial relationship. and on that route, we achieved quite a lot. i would be incomplete if i don't mention that there are problems, of course. you mentioned one of them, missile d
the united nations. the speech comes as the united states announced it is lifting the ban on the import of goods from burma. the opposition party led by aung san suu kyi has welcomed the lifting of the ban. the united states relaxed its financial restrictions after the country held elections earlier this year. here is out the u.s. secretary of state hillary clinton justified the move. >> the united states is taking the next step in normalizing our commercial will relationship. we hope this will provide more opportunities for your people to sell their goods into our markets. >> our correspondent jonathan hefad has been talking to the speaker of the burmese parliament, one of the top generals and the old regime. she gets -- began by asking about the state of relations between the government and opposition parties. >> i have a good relationship with aung san suu kyi. what happened in the past is over. it is finished. i don't see any point in dwelling on it. because she also loves the country, for people, we have the same intentions. she was locked up for many, many years. the >> she was lo
, the united states is taking the next step in normalizing our commercial relationship. >> the u.s. move will be welcomed by the people of myanmar. opposition leader, currently visiting the united states called for easing of sanctions to support her country's development. jp kne japanese business officials are asking those in myanmar to improve their business environment. the chairman of the japan chamber of commerce led a delegation and met with a senior economic official. asking for swiflter measures to ensure stable supply of power and better framework for foreign investment, the senior official said he encouraged more investment from japan. he promise they'd would work towards making business easier for foreign firms. a >>> the iranian president, mahmoud ahmadinejad, . . that they will provide support in building hospitals. they also pledge to work to promote export to iraq and to train personnel to operate such devices. >> e will work with the japanese government to raise iraq's medical capabilities. >> the equipment maker official added that his company hopes to provide the devices
further monetary policy to boost the united states economy. after last friday's disappointing labor report there is a growing call for a robust response from the central bank which is the fed, financial markets have rallied with the expectation of a third round of bond buying known as cuan tative easing. but that option is controversial with the election two months away. joining me from washington david leonhardt, washington bureau chief of the "new york times". in 2011 he won a pulitzer prize for his columns on the u.s. economy. i'm pleased to have him back on this program. >> thank you, charlie. >> rose: so what might the fed do and what consequences might happen? >> well, the fed is now talking about doing a version of something it has already done a couple timesment people may have heard the phrase q e3 to refer to what this is n technical terms that is quantitative easing 3. let's skip the technical terms, in essence it would buy up assets. in the course of buying up assets it would try to reduce long-term interest rates. short trem interest rates are already essentially at zero, the
to the building in protest of an amateur anti-muslim film produced in the united states. the film also sparked protests in egypt, where demonstrators scaled a wall of u.s. embassy in cairo and burnt the american flag. the film called "in a sense of muslims," was funded by private donors and made by director who's called islam a cancer. we will have more on this story after headlines. the white house is denying reports president obama has snubbed israeli prime minister benjamin netanyahu by refusing a meeting with netanyahu -- when netanyahu visits washington next week. the reported rift is said to center around u.s.-israeli tensions over iran, with netanyahu continuing to push for a military attack. on tuesday, he escalated his rhetoric say no one in the world can tell israel not to attack iran. >> the world says, "wait, there's still time." i say, "wait for what?" "wait until when?" those in the international community who refuse to put red lines before iran do not have a moral right to place a red light before israel. if iran knows there is no deadline, what will it do a question of exactly
of the death penalty in the united states. we will speak with his sister kimberly davis, ben jealous, and laura moye. as italy upholds the convictions of 23 cia agents for kidnapping an egyptian cleric off the streets of milan, we will look at why the obama administration has refused to prosecute anyone involved in the u.s. government secrets torture and rendition program. we will speak with alfred mccoy here in madison. he is author of "torture and impunity." >> there is an absolute ban on torture for a very good reason. torture taps into the deepest recesses of the human consciousness where creation and destruction exist. with a capacity for cruelty and kindness to exist. it has a powerful, perverse appeal. and once it starts, but the perpetrators and the powerful who order them, let it spread. it spreads out of control. >> all of that and more coming up. this is "democracy now!," democracynow.org, the war and peace report. i'm amy goodman. road in the madison, wisconsin. and this one person has been killed in pakistan as protesters fill the streets across several cities in what is expected t
. this is for every family and the united states whether they're documented are not to continue fighting for your rights and organizing. >> i have been living here for 18 years. i pay taxes. i pay more taxes than citibank. i am here because we're against the separation of families [indiscernible] and against the discrimination. >> i came to this country when i was 15, undocumented. i am here and i am not afraid. i am doing this for all of my committee, for the undocumented community. i'm tired of living in fear. i am tired of not being able to have a driver's license or go to school because i do not have legal status. for being human, i have rights. i need everyone to recognize my civil rights. we are in north carolina at the dnc, and we're trying to do civil disobedience on the streets. we're here in front of the dnc and want to tell them that they need to know what we need and they need to do something about and. we're showing them that we're not scared anymore. we're not afraid. we don't got papers and we're not afraid. >> if you got arrested today, would you face deportation? >> yes. >> educa
that come in. the fact that planned parenthood has tripled billed the united states government for services it did not perform, and it's unbelievable fraud -- unbelievable -- and that case was rejected by a district court. on appeal, the district court was overturned by the ninth circuit. and it is going forward to discovery, and the discovery is absolutely shocking. what they're doing, the fraud, and they are hitting the federal government for close to a billion dollars a year. it is unbelievable. the numbers go up. it was $200 million and then $300 million, and now i think it is close to $500 million of taxpayer money that is going to planned parenthood. and i might add, president obama said he would be willing to shut the government down if the restriction on planned parenthood continued in the negotiation. but, kristi, it is fraudulent in the extreme. and those cases are going to be body blows to planned parenthood. we're talking about huge sums. the whistle-blower complaint is triple damages. >> i think what is so fascinating, there have been so many issues for so long. why is that sup
let this go as if it is just ok, especially those of us in the united states to pay for this. i have come here and part to see what i am buying with my tax money. >> that was a pulitzer prize winning author alice walker in gaza in 2009 group last summer, she is one of the activists on the u.s. ships that attempted to sail to gaza as part of the freedom flotilla aimed at challenging israel's embargo of the gaza strip. dubbed "the audacity of hope" after president, in his best- selling book, the u.s. ship was stopped by greek authorities just as it set sail. alice walker spoke to producer aaron mate from the ship as it was turned back. >> it feels good to know that there are people on this earth to care about the people of gaza so much that we all got out of our houses and into our various cars and planes and made it to this boat, and actually tried to cross the water to get to the people of gaza, especially to the children who need to know the world is here in the world cares and the world sees. and that a lot of us love them rid we do not agree they should be brutalized and harmed. >
, when should united nations or member states intervene? >> well, these are different situations. in libya, i think we've been right in intervening because gaddafi was a dictator, and you remember that there was a sort of libyan spring, and nobody was possible because of gaddafi. therefore, a decision was taken to intervene. >> rose: is the principle you don't intervene no matter how atroacials the acts of the government in power, if in fact they have a member of the security council who opposes? or if in fact they have an army which will make it a very bloody affair. >> no. >> rose: are those the rules? >> no. the rule is because of veto if one or two people-- nations -- permanent security members-- we cannot contribute because our principle is to intervene only if we have a legal authorization. and up to now, threerussia and . and, therefore, up to now, we haven't been able to intervene. which is a humanitarian catastrophe. because every day you have more than 200 people killed. and because the security council doesn't say yes, we can't do anything. no, it's note really true. w
Search Results 0 to 27 of about 28 (some duplicates have been removed)